Mg? Ml? Half-life? A simple Q&A for all your dosing questions!

Mg? Ml? Half-life?
A simple Q&A for all your dosing questions!

 

Rats Army Mass Stack - A simple Q&A for all your dosing questions

I’m so excited about my research!

You’re about to start researching. You’re reading a lot about different dosages…
What is the optimal dose for my research? How many bottles do I need to complete my research?
These are all the questions a researcher should ask himself upfront.

So you have made your decision and you want to order.
But the label on the bottle says 20mg/ml and your bottle is 30ml. But I only need 10mg/day… Or even more difficult: I need 5mg 3 times/day?
Do I need mg or ml? How many ml do I need to complete my research?
So confusing…

Well, let us make this very simple for you!

Mg or ml?

Mg or Ml? A simple Q&A for all your dosing questions

To start off, an mg (milligram) is a unit of mass or weight equal to one-thousandth of a gram of the metric system table and an ml (milliliter) is a unit of capacity equal to one-thousandth of a liter of the metric system.
So we use mg to define the weight of an object or compound and ml to define the volume inside your bottle.

These are 2 different units of measurement so you can’t interchange them as you like.
Mg is for weight, ml is for capacity/volume.

 

So how can I calculate my daily dosage for my research?

Basic formula for dosing liquids - A simple Q&A for all your dosing questions

It is actually not that hard if you find the logic in this.
On every bottle, you have an amount of mg/ml.
Let’s take a look at RAD-140: Rat’s Army RAD-140 is dosed at 20mg/ml. That means that each ml has 20mg or RAD-140 in it.
Let’s say you will research at 10mg/day. That means that you only need 0.5 ml to have the correct amount of mg because for 10mg you only need half of the ml:

Formula for 10mg rad research

 

If you would research at 15mg/day, it is a little bit harder but you still can use the same formula: (and yes you do need a calculator for this one):

Formula for 15mg rad research

 

 

So dosing is simple.
But how much product do I need to order?

Clear Cardarine with no crystallization

This is actually the same kind of math. When you start your research you will predefine the period you want your research to cover.
Let’s say we take the same example as before and we start researching with RAD-140 for 8 weeks. We already know if we research at 10mg/day we need to administer 0.5ml/day. Our bottle contains 30ml. 8 weeks equals 56 days.
So this means we need: 0.5(or )ml x  56 days = 28ml of RAD-140. So one bottle should do.

In our second example where we dose at 15mg/day, it’s the same math: 0.75ml x 56 days =42 ml of RAD-140.

In case you have a more difficult research plan like 10mg/day for 3 weeks and 15mg/day for the other 5 weeks, it still is the same logic math behind it.
So you will need 10mg/day for 21 days and 15mg for 35 days: (0.5ml x 21 days) + (0.75ml x 35 days) = 10.5 ml + 26.25 ml = 36.75 ml of RAD-140

 

Ok. Now I get it!
Enough about dosing…
But what is half-life and how should I time my dosing?

Reusable 1ml dispenser or syringe Basic Rats Army syringe

The half-life of a drug is a pharmacokinetic parameter that is defined as the time it takes for the concentration of the drug in the plasma or the total amount in the body to be reduced by 50%.
In other words, after one half-life, the concentration of the drug in the body will be half of the starting dose.

This means that you want to optimize your research intake by taking a new dose after every half-time has passed.
This isn’t too hard and you should not worry (or be paranoid) too much about it. The drug does build up in your body so half-lives will be prolonged after a few days (so concentrations are higher after the half-life point).

If you’re very strict about it you should take a dose every ‘half-time period’.
If we take SR9009 as an example, which has a half-life of 4-5 hours, you should optimally dose every 4-5 hours so that means almost up to 6(!) times a day.
But the rule of thumb is to dose it 3 times a day: upon awakening, around noon and in the evening.

So it depends on how strict you want to go with this.In terms of dosing it’s still the same calculation. If SR9009 is our example and we want to dose it at 20mg/day we need 1ml/day.  Formula for 20mg SR9009 research

If we dose it 5 times/day we need to split our ml into 5 doses so 0.2ml/dose, if we dose it 3 times/day we split our 1ml in 3 doses so 0.33ml/dose.

Good luck with your research!

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